Gardening, Healthy Food, Wellness

Create Your Own Indoor Herb Garden

I’ve about had it with winter. The cold, the dark, and especially not having any home grown produce. I don’t know about you, but I really miss the freshness of my own garden or locally grown fruit and veggies. I also miss the smell of freshly tilled earth and digging around outside. Sigh… What’s a girl to do? How about growing an indoor herb garden?

Creating Your Own Indoor Herb Garden

The benefits of herbs range from cancer prevention to the treatment of Alzheimer’s, diabetes, and heart disease. According to the Washington Post, the polyphenols in herbs offer both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits. Sounds like a win to me!

Besides offering beauty and fresh scents, having fresh potted herbs on hand helps you prepare more flavorful and healthy home-cooked meals. Using herbs is also an easy and effective way to increase the nutritional value of your meals. NutritionFacts.org states, “Even a small amount of fresh herbs can double or even quadruple the antioxidant power of a meal.” So let’s grow some herbs! You don’t need anything elaborate. A windowsill or space in front of a window (or even a growlight) is all it takes to bring fresh taste and health benefits to our everyday meals. Below are just a few ideas to get you started.

Create Your Own Indoor Herb Garden!

Create a One-Pot Herb Garden

One way to grow herbs inside is to use just one large pot instead of many small pots. You might have a small kitchen window or space for only a single large pot. Use this to your advantage by adding several different small herb plants to the pot, giving them as much space as you can. Herbs are typically small and many require the same type of soil and watering schedule, so the majority of herbs can be grown together in the same container. This takes up less space in your kitchen and also creates a unique display of your herbs. Gardeningknowhow.com states that sage, thyme, marjoram, rosemary and oregano all have the same growth habits and will happily share one pot.

Create a Hanging Garden Above the Kitchen Sink

Maybe your kitchen window has a slim windowsill, but not a roomy ledge. Instead of trying to keep herbs on the counter or windowsill, try hanging your pots in front of the window. This is a good option when you have good light but not really any space for pots. Using a plant or macrame holder from a ceiling hook will allow your herbs to hang down in front of the window and capture that precious direct sunlight. And bonus! You’ll have pretty and fragrant greenery right at eye level. This might be a good option if you’d like to grow mint, as their root system can easily overtake other varieties of plants.

Make a Herb Terrarium

Terrariums are fun to assemble and can be a family-friendly project. As well as various greenery, you can add small objects like plastic dinosaurs or the tiny elements of a fairy garden. Tarragon, basil and cilantro are all moisture-loving herbs that would work well in a terrarium environment.

Put Herbs in Mason Jars

If you’d rather use individual containers, you can try mason jars. They are inexpensive, last a long time, and since you can see through them, you can track your plant’s growth. You can choose any size jar you like, but go for one of the wide-mouth jars. Place each herb into a mason jar, then set it in front of a window inside your home that gets the best light. Remember to place gravel at the bottom to allow for drainage, and turn your plant a little each day for even growth.

Planting your very own indoor herb garden is not only healthy but it can also provide some much appreciated greenery to your home. Hopefully the ideas above will get you growing and benefitting from your own fresh herbs. And nurturing our herb plants might just tide us over until spring. 🙂

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Learn what medicinal herbs you can grow in pots with this fun infographic.

Check out my post on the 7 amazing health benefits of Turmeric.

You can learn about the health benefits of Rosemary here.

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